Red Hat Looks to BPM ‘Game Changer’ as JBoss BPM Suite Combines Process, Rules, Events

Red Hat is shipping an integrated BPM platform engineered to provide IT and non-technical business users with full lifecycle support features for design, test, operations and monitoring. Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite aims to give companies more agility, automation and intelligence for business automation projects. 

Tags: BPM, events, jBPM, JBoss, process, Red Hat, rules,

Phil Simpson
JBoss product
marketing manager




“By integrating process, rules and events into one platform, we believe Red Hat is creating a BPM ‘game changer’ for IT and non-technical business users.”

Red Hat is shipping an integrated BPM platform engineered to provide IT and non-technical business users with full lifecycle support features for design, test, operations and monitoring. Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite aims to give companies more agility, automation and intelligence for business automation projects.

 

Red Hat’s JBoss BPM Suite unifies the best of open-source business process management, business rules and events for smarter ways to deliver a more responsive business, according to Phil Simpson, Red Hat JBoss product marketing manager.

 

Under one roof, JBoss BPM Suite integrates the Polymita BPM software (acquired in 2012) with jBPM workflow engine and Drools rules engine. “By integrating these three technologies -- process, rules and events -- into one platform, we believe Red Hat is creating a BPM ‘game changer’ for IT and non-technical business users,” Simpson told IDN.

 

“From what we see in the market, we think customers need business rules, business processes and events in a single product to fully address their business automation needs. JBoss BPM Suite uniquely delivers these capabilities in a single platform,” he added.

 

In fact, Simpson noted that events (including complex event processing) are proving to be extremely important to BPM’s business value. “To ensure optimal BPM, we feel you need to detect events, and those events can be measured,” he said, adding that events often combine with rules to automatically kick-off new or branched-off processes to handle special situations as needed.

 

Simpson added that JBoss BPM Suite also looks to offer design and modeling tools that can be used by both IT and non-technical business users to promote deeper and easier collaboration among all stakeholders.

 

“The key to getting value from BPM adoption is providing companies easy and fast ways to model, deploy and automate business processes. Our ability [with JBoss BPM Suite] to support both IT and business users will let companies address the higher rates of changes they are seeing today in their business,” he added.

 

On this point, JBoss BPM Suite is designed to promote collaboration across design, test and launch for processes, rules and policies, Simpson said. For technical users, JBoss BPM Suite supports a range of tools and plug-ins that work with BPMN process models, including JBoss, Developer Studio, Visio, and Eclipse-based tools. For non-technical users, Red Hat provides easier-to-use visual design tools for working with process models, rules and event definitions.

 

”Everything is based on open standards, such as BPMN, so to the extent you can develop using standards-based models in other tools we can certainly support those,” Simpson said.

 

Notable JBoss BPM Suite capabilities across the BPM lifecycle include:

 

Business Process Modeling. A set of web-based graphical tools that help business and IT users create and manage BPMN2-compliant business process diagrams. The models can be executed by JBoss BPM Suite runtime. Further, these standards-based diagrams that come from the Red Hat tools can easily be exchanged with other third-party BPMN2 tools, as well as exported in many formats for use in documentation.

 

Data modeling. Beyond modeling for business process, the JBoss data modeling tool allows users to capture and describe the business data entities that drive processes – and decisions. The tool enables users to simply describe complex data entities (e.g., purchase orders, insurance claims, loan applications, etc.). This makes such data easier to document and share with process models.

 

Forms designer. Another set of web-based WYSIWYG drag-and-drop tools creates sophisticated end-user forms. Red Hat’s idea behind offering a separate forms designer is to allow workers to use forms to simplify inputs and displays of data that will help move along a process or case, Simpson said.

 

Process simulation. When the model is exercised, reports can be generated to show the dynamic behaviors of those models. These simulations help users (technical and non-technical) locate bottlenecks, estimate costs, and more. The simulations comply with BPSim (Business Process Simulation Interchange Standard). Process models can also be annotated with simulation parameters to reveal time or cost required to complete each step. “With these simulations, users see and measure the outcomes of process changes before they go live,” Simpson added.

 

Service integration. To support end-to-end operations, JBoss BPM Suite provides straightforward mechanisms for users to connect business processes with external applications and data. It comes with native support for integrating business processes with web services. The suite is also certified for use with the full portfolio of Red Hat JBoss Middleware integration products, including Red Hat JBoss Fuse, Red Hat JBoss Fuse Service Works, and Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization, he said.

 

Business activity monitoring. During runtime operations, users obtain real-time business activity monitoring and reporting tools. The result is real-time visibility into complex processes and business events that will help users measure and analyze a wide range of key indicators, as well as track process performance, and make quick decisions, Simpson added.

 

Red Hat’s JBoss BPM Suite
Integrating Process, Rules & Events


One of the main visions at Red Hat that drove the innovations found in JBoss BPM Suite is to offer an agile platform with components where IT and business stakeholders can better and more easily collaborate on initial processes, and give non-technical users the ability to make changes as needed. “The tight integration between design tools and an execution engine will make it easier for companies to set up a continuous cycle of intelligent processes,” Simpson said.

 

The integrated approach also means that JBoss BPM Suite can also automatically detect results of these processes, capture information (from data, interactions, events, etc.), and present them in meaningful dashboards to both IT and non-technical business users. In addition, as fresh information about a process comes in, results are presented to help stakeholders make informed decisions about if and how a process should change.

 

Simpson also noted Red Hat’s attention to a rich range of integration engineering that underpins the JBoss BPM Suite’s enterprise-class performance. “Our tight integration of runtime capabilities along with tooling gives new abilities to leverage many assets of a company all within a single model, and do so quickly,” Simpson added.

 

Even more than that, the detailed attention to integration adds a further benefit, Simpson said.

 

 

“We’ve integrated [these] into a coherent enterprise BPM product. You could consume jBPM and Drools from the [open-source] community, but then you would have to integrate those yourself. So, all this work to integrate these suites and certify that they work on different environments, different databases and app servers is part of the value prop we’re delivering,” he added.

 

The JBoss BPM Suite platform is available now, and can be deployed across physical, virtual, mobile, and cloud environments. For traditional environments, JBoss BPM Suite can leverage JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 6 clustering to meet scalability and high availability deployment needs. For private or public cloud, JBoss BPM Suite is compatible with platform-as-a-service (PaaS) environments, such as OpenShift. This architecture sets the stage for a cloud-based BPM service, or what Red Hat calls a ‘bpmPaaS’ option, Simpson added.




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