Eucalyptus 3.2 Sports Features, Best Practices To Improve Cloud Self-Service, Management

Eucalyptus Systems is speeding up enterprise-caliber cloud projects with new automation, orchestration, management and security features for its open source private and hybrid cloud technology. Eucalyptus 3.2 also helps IT implement a growing list of proven cloud best practices. IDN speaks with Eucalyptus vice president of products Andy Knosp. 

Tags: AWS, cloud management, Eucalyptus, hybrid cloud, orchestration, private cloud, security, self-service, expert voice,

Andy Knosp
vice president of products
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“We added important features to Eucalyptus 3.2 to help IT quickly optimize private clouds for dev/test and provisioning.”

Eucalyptus Systems is speeding up enterprise-caliber cloud projects with new automation, orchestration, management and security features for its open source private and hybrid cloud technology. Eucalyptus 3.2 also helps IT implement a growing list of proven cloud best practices.

“As we worked on Eucalyptus 3.2 last year, we had in mind that it’s still early in the dev/ops journey for cloud. So, we added important features that would help IT quickly optimize private clouds for dev/test and provisioning,” Eucalyptus vice president of products Andy Knosp told IDN. 

Released last late year, Eucalyptus 3.2 added several key features for enterprise-class private and hybrid clouds, including visibility, control and management of cloud resources and operations. Further, it sports a new GUI to empower users to do more self-service.

Eucalyptus’ private cloud improvements also aim to give users of public clouds, such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), a more attractive option for speeding up dev/test while also adding more control and security, Knosp added.

In one example, a pharmaceutical firm is conducting cloud dev/test using Eucalyptus 3.2 because it needed to keep its data local and meet important data compliance requirements, he said.

“The ability to orchestrate and automate dev/test processes is another area where there is a huge amount of benefits,” Knosp said. To promote more seamless orchestration, and speed time between tasks, Eucalyptus 3.2 adds features to assemble a wide range of tools and services – including issue tracking, source control, continuous integration, continuous build and test automation.

eucalyptus_01Another big stumbling block to better dev/test outcomes, Knosp added, is lack of control or coordination. “There are so many independent activities with varying resource requirements. And they all need to share some common infrastructure resources at one time or another,” Knosp said.

Eucalyptus also cuts ramp-up times by allowing devs to easily leverage the tools they may use for AWS projects via a set of programmatic APIs. Smart APIs and web interfaces also power self-service provisioning of resources. “Providing a cloud approach that gives dev/test [professionals] readily available and self-service access is not just a nice-to-have for it. It will reduce time and expense for applications and cut cycle times,” Knosp said.

Taken in total, in fact, Eucalyptus 3.2’s new technologies help IT achieve some important proven best practices for private cloud success. Eucalyptus co-founder and CTO Rich Wolski listed some of these in a recent blog post.

  • Security and control: Make sure enterprise applications comply with all corporate regulatory and corporate restrictions.
  • Interoperability: ROI can depend on efficient and reliable integration (with both design time and runtime resources). This can include legacy data systems, as well as key dev/test tools.
  • Performance: Ensure the hardware and infrastructure can provide adequate performance levels for maximum uptime.
  • Monitoring: IT should determine a full-featured logging and tracking mechanism for troubleshooting.
  • Flexibility: Teams working on cloud-facing dev/test projects should have the ability to select the type of cloud most appropriate for their needs at a given time (public, private, hybrid). 

Guided by these cloud best practices, Eucalyptus 3.2 adds and updates a range of technologies with a focus on improving self-service and management for devs and cloud admins.

Self-Service: A new web GUI for cloud “user control” promotes self-service provisioning of compute, network, and storage resources. It also lest devs perform key self-service operations (provisioning of instances, keypair/password creation, access to image catalogues, Elastic Block Store (EBS) volume and snapshot operations, and more).

Cloud Management: Easy usage reports let admins more easily understand usage of cloud resources, provide chargeback for resources consumed, and facilitate capacity planning. Cloud admins also have better logging capabilities for faster troubleshooting and issue resolution.

Eucalyptus 3.2 also sports other key updates to accelerate dev/test and add efficiency and reliability to private or hybrid clouds, including:

  • Support for AWS cloud APIs for images, storage, configuration management, QoS and identity management
  • Ability to manage resource access via controls that can quota limit individual users and groups
  • Support for deep ID and Access Management and ability to leverage existing directory services (e.g. LDAP) to manage users, groups and security policies
  • Lease mechanism for “garbage collection” to allow devs to recover resources for other tasks
  • Support to let devs deploy entire software stacks from simple EMI images
  • Allows devs to build custom images or use any of the thousands of AMIs available from the AWS ecosystem


A major cloud analyst said Eucalyptus latest upgrades respond to growing enterprise requests for more cloud control and agility. 

“Visibility and control are foundational elements in driving the broader adoption of cloud computing in the enterprise. [They] are critical customers pursuing a hybrid approach where applications may run on multiple clouds, private or public, for maximum flexibility in supporting business needs,” said Aneel Lakhani, a research director at Gartner, in a statement.




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